One Big Broadcast Blogs - Autospeak-Straight Talk
Showing posts for category Marketing to Hispanics (Back to Index)
Bookmark and Share

Get Your Hispanic Marketing Campaign Right

Tags:
(Posted on Dec 27, 2014 at 06:33AM by William Cosgrove)


The Hispanic Segment of the population in this country represents the 13th Largest Economy in the World and is the youngest, fastest growing segment of the US population representing 60 % of overall population growth with a per cap income of $39,730 with 25% of this segment at $75,000. (Slide Show)


Get Your Hispanic Marketing Campaign Right


by Diego Prusky

Many companies have increased their Hispanic marketing budgets, particularly in the mobile and social arena — there are 22 million Hispanic daily active users on Facebook, and 14% of the Hispanic population is active on Twitter — but most don’t invest the money, time and energy required to fully understand the nuances that exist within the U.S. Hispanic community. As a result, they often fail to connect with their target audience. Read More

Hispanics Ahead Of The Digital Curve

Tags:
(Posted on Aug 28, 2014 at 04:38AM by William Cosgrove)
Picture According to an analysis of strategies of leading brands and forward-thinking marketers by Lisa Gevelber, Vice President of Americas Marketing, U.S. Hispanic demographic trends indicate a 163% increase in population between 2010 and 2050, making up 30% of the population by July 1, 2050, and one trillion dollars in buying power in 2010, rising to $1.5 trillion next year (an increase of 50% in just five years).

Marla Skiko, senior vice president and director of digital innovation at SMG Multicultural, says "… marketers may think they trail… general market in adoption of new tech… (though) they are far ahead…  should be among the first prospects for marketers… to grow their consumer base…"

A survey of a panel of senior-level marketers, says the report, saw 11–25% of their company’s growth coming from this demographic in the next three to five years, but most brands didn’t have a marketing strategy for this audience.

The analysis found that, in looking at the strategies of leading brands and forward-thinking marketers, "U.S. Hispanics are ahead of the curve when it comes to digital. They lead in adoption of new devices. They are power users of mobile and over-index in video consumption."

Selections of the data supporting these observations and conclusions are included in the report…

Fabian Castro, senior vice president, multicultural marketing for Universal Pictures, notes that they promote “close to” to 80% of its releases annually to the U.S. Hispanic audience. The average Hispanic spends more than eight hours watching online video each month, over 90 minutes longer than the U.S. average, according to Nielsen.

According to Think With Google, YouTube views of top U.S. Hispanic channels are up 1.25x year over year. In the two years since the launch of the bilingual multi-channel network MiTu, the network has grown an audience of more than 36 million subscribers, one-third the number of subscribers to HBO, a forty year old network. Brands are tapping into this growth through endorsements and sponsorships.

A lot of Hispanic video watching happens on mobile, says the report, as smartphones are becoming the "first screen." Nielsen reports that 10 million Hispanics watch mobile video for an average of more than six hours per month. Among smartphone owners, Hispanics are 17% more likely than non-Hispanics to access the web more through their phone than through a computer, and more likely to upgrade or replace their mobile headsets and buy tablets. According to a Google Consumer Survey, Hispanics are 1.5x more likely to buy mobile apps and digital media than non-Hispanics.

Too often, marketers think they’re reaching U.S. Hispanics by simply translating ads and websites into Spanish, suggests the report, but there is a big opportunity to reach these consumers in both languages. A recent Google Consumer Survey showed that the majority of U.S. Hispanic mobile users typically search in English or a mix of English and Spanish. At the same time, the number of Google searches that include common Spanish-language question words nearly doubled over the past three years.

Language isn’t enough, though, notes the analysis. To speak to this audience one needs to be culturally relevant as well. As Castro puts it, "Culture is the new language.”  The U.S. Hispanic audience will only gain cultural and economic prominence in the coming years. This isn’t just sheer numbers; it’s technology, concludes the analysis and report.

Reposted from MediaPost


For additional information from Think with Google, please visit here.

more on Marketing to Hispanics


Image courtesy of Univision

Engage Hispanics: Marketers Are Still Not Investing Enough In Digital Media

Tags:
(Posted on Aug 18, 2014 at 05:03AM by William Cosgrove)
 By Lee Vann founder and CEO of Captura Group
 
Picture Every year around this time I am excited to analyze the Advertising Age Hispanic Fact Pack from a digital perspective. Every year I am optimistic that marketers will finally realize that U.S. Hispanics spend most of their time consuming digital media and allocate their marketing budgets accordingly.

And every year I am disappointed to find that marketers are not capitalizing on the Hispanic digital opportunity despite clear and compelling data.

U.S. Hispanics Spend Most of Their Time Consuming Digital Media

U.S. Hispanics can’t get enough digital media. What’s more, relative to Non-Hispanics, U.S. Hispanics spend less time watching TV and more time consuming digital media. According to data from Experian Marketing Services published in the 2014 Ad Age Hispanic Fact Pack, here is how U.S. Hispanics consume media on a daily basis:


  • Watching TV: 3.3 hours per day
  • Using Internet on home computer: 3.3 
  • Playing video games on tablet: 2.2 
  • Playing video games on gaming console: 2.1 
  • Watching videos online: 2.0 
  • Using Internet on tablet: 2.0 
  • Listening to Internet radio: 1.9 
U.S. Hispanics not only spend more time with digital media, they also have positive attitudes towards it. The same source found that relative to non-Hispanics, U.S. Hispanics are more likely to engage with brands on social media and make purchasing decisions because of social media interactions. The following findings cited in the Hispanic Fact Pack clearly illustrate this point, with Hispanics being more likely than non-Hispanics to:

  • Purchase products advertised via social media (10.9% versus 8.3%)
  • Purchase products recommended by friends via social media (18.3% versus 17.8%)
  • Like brands on social media sites (23.5% vs. 20.2%)
  • Spread the word about brands via social media (23.9% vs. 20.2%)
Only 7% of Hispanic Media Budgets Go to Digital Media

Given that U.S. Hispanics spend the majority of their time consuming digital media, you would think that marketers would invest the majority of their U.S. Hispanic media budgets on digital, but this is not the case. In fact, marketers invested only 7% of Hispanic media budgets on digital. According to the Ad Age Hispanic Fact Pack, marketers invested a total of $8.3 billion on U.S. Hispanic media in 2013, broken down as follows:


  • TV: $6.10 billion up 5.3% from 2012
  • Print: $1.15 billion up 13.5% from 2012
  • Digital: $580 million up 31.8% from 2012
  • Radio: $466 million up 8.0% from 2012
Yes, investment in U.S. Hispanic digital media grew the fastest between 2012 and 2013, but still is nowhere near commensurate with how U.S. Hispanics consume media.

Why Aren’t Marketers Investing More in Hispanic Digital Media?

The gap between U.S. Hispanic media consumption and investments in U.S. Hispanic media is clear, what is not clear is why the gap exists. Several factors might explain this phenomenon.

Consumers move much faster than marketers. The 30-second TV spot dominated the marketing landscape for a long time and marketers are still trying to adjust to the new digital reality. Add to that factors that specifically impact the Hispanic market and the reasons behind the gap become clearer. 

First, marketers need a specific expertise to successfully reach U.S. Hispanics, and there are simply not enough Hispanic marketing professionals out there. In addition, the current “Total Market” conversation has led some marketers to believe that they can succeed with U.S. Hispanics through general market campaigns. Finally, when it comes to the U.S. Hispanic market, budgets have traditionally been small.

Regardless of why the gap exists, Hispanic digital remains a huge opportunity for those that are willing to invest in it and I hope to be writing about just that when I analyze next year’s Ad Age Hispanic Fact Pack.


More on marketing to Hispanics

Reposted from Mediapost.com

Image courtesy of unlockorlando.com

Futurecasting Latino Millenials And The New Initiative

Tags:
(Posted on Jun 10, 2014 at 06:25AM by William Cosgrove)

More organizations are paying attention to Hispanics and Hispanic Millennials are drawing a great deal of that attention for reasons discussed in our recently released project:

  • Hispanic Millennials make up the second largest Hispanic cohort living in the U.S. – accounting for 25% of all Hispanics
  • Hispanic Millennials account for a sizeable proportion – 21% – of all U.S. Millennials
  • Hispanic Millennials now make up the majority of Millennials in key DMAs

Our findings, like other studies on Hispanic Millennials, are captivating marketers to focus on this key demographic today. The present focus of most companies is on how to better market to Hispanic Millennials to get them to buy their products and services. However, after having pored through the detailed data underpinning the project, I realized there is more to this research than some supporting data points on the how to better market to Hispanic Millennials today. Hidden in the data is a fascinating glimpse into a future marketplace where organizations have to fundamentally change their approach to the Hispanic market.

I introduced the concept of “futurecasting” the Hispanic market in 2011. Futurecasting is a heuristic technique that helps envision future consumers, products, industries, competitors, challenges, or marketplaces; by combining forecasting and imagination to model future states.

Using the data in the Hispanic Millennial Project Wave 1 research, we can begin to futurecast Hispanic Millennials – looking at how Hispanic Millennials will impact the marketplace in 5, 10 and 20 years. Three key insights emerged: 

  • Hispanic Millennials will be very attractive consumers – educated homeowners with children, likely to own their own business
    • 46% plan on completing college (vs. 31% of non-Hispanic Millennials)
    • 47% (of those without children) say having children is a future goal 
  • Hispanic Millennials will drive business starts and entrepreneurship
    • 47% of Hispanic Millennials perceive owning their own business as a strong indicator of success; 48% view it as a future goal.
  • Hispanic Millennials are the ideal brand advocates of the future
    • They are satisfied with their lives, optimistic about the future and have a strong belief in the American Dream
    • 67% of them say they want to stand out as a Latino

Futurecasting Hispanic Millennials provides us a glimpse into a much different Hispanic marketplace than before. Historically, most organizations have focused their efforts on selling to Hispanics. However, as large, forward-thinking organizations begin to plan out their Hispanic “initiatives,” this future Hispanic marketplace necessitates a new, more holistic Hispanic approach. Specifically, moving from one dimensional marketing to what I am calling “Three Dimensional Hispanic integration.”

Three Dimensional Hispanic Integration Model

hispanicintegrationmodel-b.jpg

Marketing – Marketing to Hispanics has been the dominant focus of Hispanic efforts by organizations in the U.S. the last 50 years. However, there is an opportunity to centralize these efforts. One way is by leading with Hispanic insights – something I’ve described in my posts around Total Market Approach and the emergent opportunity for cross-cultural marketing.

Procurement – Many large Fortune 500s have developed sophisticated supplier diversity efforts over the last 10-15 years to increase the number of minority-owned – particularly – Hispanic-owned businesses they do business with. But the futurecasting exercise shows us the central role Hispanic entrepreneurs will have in driving new business growth. For companies looking to continue innovating, they will need innovative, young business partners and suppliers – many which will be Hispanic-owned. This necessitates raising the bar on supplier diversity efforts.

Hispanic Products – This is the keystone of Hispanic integration. Some CPGs and movie studios have experimented with this strategy. The idea is two-fold – create products and services that connect with Hispanics at a cultural level and involve Hispanics in the creation of new products and services. The studios have been starting to do this by cultivating Hispanic talent in front of and behind the camera. CPGs have tested out new products incorporating Hispanic flavors and heritage. However, companies will have to go well beyond one-off experiments and make this a central part of their corporate strategies, to leverage the large, attractive population of future Hispanic brand advocates.

By Jose Villa

Also Read:
Engage Hispanics A Quick Review Of What You Need To Know About Marketing To Millenials

 

 

How HSN is targeting Hispanics on mobile to gain a competitive edge

Tags:
(Posted on Jun 5, 2014 at 04:48AM by William Cosgrove)
Picture
HSN’s innovative Univision partnership to reach Hispanic consumers via a mix of content and commerce across channels recently came out of beta, with mobile driving 60 percent of the awareness for the effort.

The home shopping network decided to double down on the Hispanic market after realizing several important areas of cross-over with its offerings. Recent findings from a PwC report suggest that mobile will play a bigger role for marketers in targeting the Hispanic market, with these consumers more likely to access coupons, bank, make a payment, watch videos, use location-based apps and text more than non-Hispanics.

“The Hispanic strategy as a focus has really been in the last year,” said Sean Bunner, vice president of new business development at HSN, St. Petersburg, FL. “HSN has traditionally not targeted a particular demographic or even local regions.


“I have not seen people focusing on this as much,” he said. “There are a lot of reports revealing things like that Hispanics shop at The Gap and a lot of the places that other people like to shop so I think that people rest on their laurels and little bit and say , ‘Oh, that traffic is going to come here.’

“When you dig a little bit deeper, loyalty to a brand or a retailer is significantly higher in his population than to the general population. I think being a leader and being ahead is really going to be an advantage of HSN over time.”

Late in 2013, HSN and Univision launched in beta Boutique Univision, una tienda de HSN as a fully-integrated experience promoting HSN products and supported with a comprehensive marketing campaign across HSN and Univision television, digital and social media channels.

Now that the responsive Web experience has come out of beta, the commerce element is fully supported by HSN.

Here, Mr. Bunner discusses why Hispanics are an important demographic for the brand going forward and how it is tailoring the HSN experience to meet the needs of these consumers.

Besides the growth in the Hispanic market, what other factors encouraged HSN to make this demographic a strategic focus? 
HSN really focuses on women and an upscale woman who is a shopper. Her lifestyle and home are important to her.

As we looked a little deeper into the Hispanic market, there are more than 11 million Hispanic women in the U.S. that are over 35 and that group is growing four times faster than the U.S. population. As we look to get the message of the HSN brand out, it is a very important group for us to reach.

A lot of the categories or the software side that HSN accelerates on , products for your home, electronics, mobile, fashion, entertainment, community, things that if you pull any marketing study related to Hispanics, you are going to find those words and use cases, those are all things that are a part of our business.

We saw a lot of parallels in our business, we saw a lot of parallels in our strategy.

To kick that off and the public facing side of the strategy is our partnership with Univision and that site, Boutique Univision, which we launched and are growing with Univision.

What role and how big a role is mobile playing the Univision partnership? 
It is a centerpiece and more so in the future. I don’t know that all retailers are seeing this, but HSN with the type of customer that we have that is very engaged, we obviously sell a lot of electronics and have a big part in educating our consumers in how to use them.

Mobile is a very vast part of our business. It is now over 50 percent of our entire business. It is becoming the majority of all of our digital traffic.
We were already focused on mobile. This customer, a lot of times it is the primary device that they see their world through. So it is a nice marriage. We didn’t have to change our strategy, we just kind of had to direct our strategy in cooperation with Univision.

How are you making consumers aware of the program? 
One of the components of our deal is that we get guaranteed placement across Univision’s digital properties in shows like Despierta America.

On the digital side, it is twice the weighting that you would normally see in a campaign to mobile versus desktop. There mobile ads appearing on Univision mobile properties directing them to the boutique.

We are seeing more than 60 percent of the awareness for the experience coming from mobile within Univision’s network. That is significantly higher than a typical campaign. That is an early learning. We want to evolve through how conversions look across channels.

Increasingly in the future, the actual commerce store itself is going to have more and more of a specific place in mobile. We have the exclusive right to power their ecommerce store.

The site has a combination of things that are specific to their network.

Right now, we have a World Cup promotion with Coca-Cola that we wouldn’t necessarily run on HSN. And then we have the best curated everyday assortment of products that we think are right for that audience.

The site is also part of their Web site but it is fully powered by HSN. The transaction itself happens on HSN.

Increasingly in the future we will probably take that transaction to Univision, but right now you come to HSN and then check out through normal HSN methods.

Were there any challenges in bringing this experience to the mobile user? 
There are always challenges and that space is evolving. Responsive design is something that we have been doing for some time. That enables us to have it not be a science project every time that we want to figure how do we make the experiences relevant and work the right way for the consumer.

Responsive design is where we are at now. In the future, we will look at is there a custom experience that is right for that consumer on Univision that is mobile specific.

You know how difficult content management is on your own properties but doing that with another large media company – so we worked through a lot of that process. The site we launched is now fully powered by HSN. We have the ability to update content in real time. That is evolving along with our merchandise strategy throughout the summer.

How is the site catering to the needs of the Hispanic consumer? 
Experience is perhaps the most challenging part of this. Univision knows how to do their experience that is relevant for their customer, we know how to do ours. So that has really been a lot of the learnings for the first six months, is marrying those two. We know that we have to look and feel a little bit different to be relevant in the future. It is nice to learn that from a company like Univision.

We are looking at when should be doing something like site translation, when should we have other Hispanic specific options at each stage, we will learn that through our partner.

An early example was our exclusive launch of the Sofia Vergara fragrance. We took some exclusive access to that community.

There are some products that we sell – national brands, beauty products – that are perfect for that audience. There are other areas where we are going to have holes and whites spaces. So learning that now and heading into the back half of this year, we are really trying to bring on the right partners and bring brands that will be relevant to that audience.

How do you expect the strategy to evolve going forward? 
The learnings that we are going to get during ht rest of this year on usage patterns, I am particularly interested in. There are two ways to cut it: the device itself – pc vs. tablet vs. phone - and then the application itself - is it an app or a mobile site.

We see on our site differences that are sometimes dramatic in the categories and the percentage of sales for electronics vs. fashion, for instance.

We see pretty significant differences between the HSN app and the HSN mobile optimized sites. I want to see, do I see those same kinds of learnings on the Univision side. And then really how do we adjust heading into 2015 to be more relevant and more targeted.

By Chantal Tode

See Slide Show

ComproCoches.us

Tags:
(Posted on May 25, 2014 at 11:31AM by William Cosgrove)
 
Award winning OneBigBroadcast (OBB) has just finished the successful pre- launch, of ComproCoches, a first to market car classified and social community site built to culturally reach the fastest growing and most connected segment of the US population.
 
The Hispanic Segment of the population in this country represents the 13th Largest Economy in the World and is the youngest, fastest growing segment of the US population representing 60 % of overall population growth with a per cap income of $39,730 with 25% of this segment at $75,000. See Slide Show at http://comprocoches.us/dealerpresentacion



5 reasons that make ComproCoches a significant addition to your marketing strategy
 

1. Proven Reach:
 ComproCoches offers a proven platform design to deliver your message to this important  market to provide a new source of revenue now and into the future. Since the pre-launch on December 4th of this year, ComproCoches has had over 250,000 page views substantiating the potential reach of a unique site of this kind.
 

2. Existing Market : *Percent of total population ( Call for your Geographic Area)

Central PA-  As of April 12th, 2012 according to The US Census Bueau had over
127,512 Hispanics within Harrisburg*18%-York- Lebanon*32.1%-Lancaster
39.3%- Reading*58.2% and increasing at 60% of overall population growth.
 
Lehigh Valley-Philadelphia – Total Hispanics over 284,118. Allentown*42.8%-Bethlehem*24.4%-Easton*19.9%-Hazleton*37.3%-Philadelphia-12.3%-Norristown-28.3%
 

3. Marketing:

ComproCoches and PhotoRep are built with OBB’s award winning proprietary and fully mobile marketing platform technology that provides you with some of the most advanced analytic and marketing tools  (including OBB’s Banner Ads & “Splash” Events plugins) available in the marketplace today.
 

4. Leads:

All leads are the sole property of the dealer. ComproCoches does not market or send your leads to other Automotive Dealers.
 

5. Significance

The Hispanic Segment of the population in this country represents the 13th Largest Economy in the World and is the youngest, fastest growing segment of the US population representing 60 % of overall population growth with a per cap income of $39,730 with 25% of this segment at $75,000.
 
Michael Sebastian AdAge Media News "Publishing companies realized they had to do a specific product for Hispanic consumers," he said. "It was not just about adding a couple of pages in their main book to reach these consumers."


Mario Carrasco  partner at ThinkNow Research says "Language is and will always be a factor.

Cultural relevancy and the appropriate use of language in your marketing messages to the Hispanic market can make or break your attempts to attract their attention.

And specifically, if you want to advertise to Hispanic Millennials, then you better be prepared to communicate (TV, radio, internet, magazines) in both English and Spanish because, according to our study, 35% of them consume their media mostly or exclusively in English, 25% in Spanish, and 40% claimed English and Spanish equally.

Key takeaway? 

U.S. Hispanic Millennials have their own distinct traits. Take the time to learn what they are and get in early while everyone else is still trying to figure it out."


                             See Slide Show and our Special Introductory Special at http://comprocoches.us/dealerpresentacion
                                                                                        

 

Engage Hispanics:A Quick Review Of What You Need To Know About Marketing To Millennials

Tags:
(Posted on May 23, 2014 at 06:39AM by William Cosgrove)

As a whole, Millennials are quickly stealing the spotlight from its predecessors, Gen X and Baby Boomers. Why? Because there are over 80 million of them now coming of age and moving into the workforce. This increased buying power is influencing their purchase decisions and driving major trends within the economy.

Of all Millennials nationwide, Hispanics comprise 21%, a statistic expected to rise to 23% by 2020. And within the U.S. Hispanic community itself, Millennials represent 25% of the population and make up the majority of all Millennials in cities like Los Angeles, Miami-Ft. Lauderdale and San Antonio.

But reaching this market isn’t just about the numbers, and relying on volume and skimping on value is still the worse possible way to reach them. I’ll tell you why.

Hispanics are a unique and diverse group.

I’ll concede that trying to understanding Hispanic Millennials is tough because while they share some similarities with the rest of their generation, they are a unique group, even when compared to other Hispanic segments and sub-groups.

Let’s look at the stats. Early results from the Hispanic Millennial Project, co-sponsored by ThinkNow Research and Sensis, shows that when compared to older Hispanics (35-64 years of age):

  • Hispanic Millennials are more positive in their overall outlook
  • 61% of Hispanic Millennials are satisfied with where they are in life, compared to only 47% for 35-64 year olds
  • “My quality of life is better than my parents”… 65% vs. 55%
  • On being optimistic about the future… a whopping 70% vs. 49%
  • Interestingly, they are more aligned with their Hispanic heritage
  • 67% of Hispanic Millennials said they want to stand out as a Latino, compared to 52% for the older group
  • On “feeling closer to the Latino culture”… it’s 47% vs. 30%

Hispanic Millennials also differ significantly from Non-Hispanic Millennials…

  • They are more optimistic
  • 63% of Hispanic Millennials said they were satisfied with the direction of the U.S., compared to just 39% for non-Hispanics.
  • On being “extremely optimistic about the future”… it was 70% vs. 52%
  • On their belief in the “American Dream”… Hispanic Millennials 71%, non-Hispanic Millennials 55%
  • And as part of their “American Dream”
  • 48% of Hispanic Millennials have a goal of owning their own business, compared to just 29% for non-Hispanics
  • Graduating from college? 46% vs. 31%

In contrast with Non-Hispanic Millennials, today’s Hispanic Millennials strive for the more traditional markers of success such as owning a home, buying a nice car and going to college.

And when U.S.-born and foreign-born Hispanic Millennials were compared, across the board, foreign-born Millennials seem to have what might be referred to as a more “traditional” or “conservative” belief system, showing in some cases as much as a 20% variance in their opinions toward topics like same-sex marriage and religion.

Language is and will always be a factor.

Cultural relevancy and the appropriate use of language in your marketing messages to the Hispanic market can make or break your attempts to attract their attention.

And specifically, if you want to advertise to Hispanic Millennials, then you better be prepared to communicate (TV, radio, internet, magazines) in both English and Spanish because, according to our study, 35% of them consume their media mostly or exclusively in English, 25% in Spanish, and 40% claimed English and Spanish equally.

Key takeaway? 

U.S. Hispanic Millennials have their own distinct traits. Take the time to learn what they are and get in early while everyone else is still trying to figure it out.

By Mario Carrasco


See Slide Show Click Here
 

Non Hispanic Whites to Drop Below 60% of the Population by 2019

Tags:
(Posted on Mar 25, 2014 at 05:16AM by William Cosgrove)
The US population (excluding Puerto Rico) is becoming increasingly multicultural, and more than 40% of the population will belong to one of the 3 major ethnic groups by 2019, according to a recent report [pdf] from Geoscape. This year, non-Hispanic whites are estimated to account for 62.1% of the US population, down from 75.8% in 1990. By 2019, that figure will be down to 59.5%, as Americans of Hispanic and Asian origin will grow to represent about one-quarter of the population.

AdvertisementThat’s a drastic change from 1990, when these groups combined to account for 11.6% of the population. Between 1990 and this year, the share of Americans of Hispanic origin has doubled from 8.8% to 17.7%, while for non-Hispanic Asian and Pacific Islanders, their population shares are up from 2.8% to 5.1%.

Based on these trends, Geoscape projects that the non-Hispanic white population will drop to a minority by 2040. In late 2012, the Census Bureau forecast that the US will become a majority-minority nation in 2043.

It’s no surprise, of course, that minority groups are growing at rapid rates, but the extent to which these groups are contributing to America’s population growth are noteworthy. Between 2010 and this year, Geoscape estimates that Hispanics (60.3%), Asians (14.5%) and Blacks (12.7%) will have combined for 87.6% of the country’s population growth. Between 2014 and 2019, they’ll comprise 88.9% of population growth.

How does that work out in absolute numbers? The study forecasts that there will be an additional 1.7 million Hispanic Americans per year between 2014 and 2019, along with about half-a-million more African American and non-Hispanic Blacks and roughly 580,000 more non-Hispanic Asian and Pacific Islanders.

In sum, among the projected 334.1 million Americans in 2019:


  • 198.9 million will be non-Hispanic white;
  • 64.8 million will be Hispanic;
  • 41.5 million will be Black; and
  • 19.3 million will be Asian and Pacific Islanders.
Of course, these minority groups have various characteristics, and can broken up into sub-cultures across different variables, including language.

Among Hispanics, for instance, Geoscape says that:


  • 22% are English-Dependent;
  • 31% are Bi-Lingual English Preferred;
  • 14% are Bi-Lingual;
  • 19% are Bi-Lingual Spanish Preferred; and
  • 14% are Spanish-Dependent.
In terms of acculturation, some 16.8% are English dominant, born in the US, 3rd+ generation with few Hispanic cultural practices, while 13.1% are Spanish-dominant recent immigrants (less than 10 years ago) who have primarily Hispanic cultural practices and identify with their home country more than the US.

Asians, by comparison, tend to be more “Westernized.” Some 38.3% are English-dominant, born in the US, 3rd+ generation with few Asian cultural practices, compared to 13.3% on the other end of the spectrum, who speak nearly no English, recently immigrated as adults, and primarily engage in Asian cultural practices.

Though they hail from a diverse array of countries, Asians are most likely to be of Chinese and Taiwanese (24%) origin, with Indian (19%) and Filipinos (18%) the next-largest representation.

By MarketingCharts staff


Related Articles:

America's New Baby Boomers


A Market Not to be Ignored

Hispanics: A Segment Marketers Can't Afford To Ignore

Tags:
(Posted on Mar 15, 2014 at 06:39AM by William Cosgrove)
The following article written by a Hispanic mom raising kids here in the US shares a perspective that is shared by a large segment of the US Hispanic population.

Having researched this subject over the past 8 years both here and  in South America I am glad to see that it is now being talked about more and more because the statistics are staggering. ( A Market Not to be Ignored)

The Hispanic segment of the US Population Represents the 13th largest economy in the world and are the youngest, fastest growing segment of the US population representing 60 % of overall population growth here in the US. ( America’s New Baby Boomers )

The tremendous Buying power of Hispanics is growing exponentially including a current per capita income closing in on the national average makes it important to finds ways to effectively penetrate this market now and into the future.

Hispanics: A Segment Marketers Can't Afford To Ingnore
Picture As a Hispanic woman raising kids in the United States, I'm especially attuned to the attitudes and challenges of moms like me. But in the past couple of years, I've noticed that a lot of big brands are tuning into our needs as well. The reason is simple: Between 2000 and 2010, the Hispanic population grew by 43% – that's four times the general rate of population growth.

And as the percentage of Hispanic households earning higher incomes also grows dramatically, marketers are beginning to realize that this is a segment they can't afford to ignore. Of course, marketing to Hispanic moms means more than hiring a Spanish translation service. We're culturally unique, with our own set of habits and preferences. Here are a few tips to help marketers understand us better.

We're not all alike

As a daughter of Spanish parents born in France, I've taken a unique journey to where I am today. Other Hispanic moms have their own stories to tell. Some moved here recently and speak little English; others were born here and live in bilingual homes. Marketers who understand these nuances will be better equipped to get their message across.

For our studies, we've found it useful to divide Hispanic moms into four distinct segments: completely acculturated (21%), high (40%), moderate (23%), and low (16%). It's important to know which of these segments will be most receptive to your message and understand their language preferences. For example, four in five completely acculturated Hispanics view themselves as American, while two-thirds of low-acculturated Hispanics view themselves as Latino immigrants. Overall, two-thirds of Hispanic moms prefer information in Spanish or Spanish and English together.

We're social

Moderate, high, and completely acculturated Hispanic moms are using the same social media as the general population, including Facebook (87%), parenting social media (50%), Instagram (36%), blogs (46%), and Pinterest (30%). Our research also shows that 47% of Hispanic moms use parenting social media for product and brand recommendations. So for marketers interested in these segments, it's definitely worth investing in bilingual social media efforts to deepen your engagement with this growing and receptive audience.

We're mobile

I love my smartphone, and our research confirms that Hispanic moms are heavy users of mobile technology: 82% own a smart phone, 72% own a laptop, and 51% own a tablet. According to a 2012 study, 48% of Hispanics access the Internet from smartphones, versus 38% of non-Hispanics. So if you want to reach Hispanic moms, optimize your site for mobile devices.

Our research also shows that two-thirds of Hispanic moms notice mobile ads, and that moderate and highly acculturated moms are most receptive to mobile ads in Spanish and English together. So be sure to integrate these two languages into your communications as seamlessly as possible.

We're looking for deals

Hispanic moms are receptive to messages from their favorite brands – especially if those messages can help them save money. Moderate, high, and completely acculturated moms tell us they're most interested in following brands on social media for coupons and discounts. They're more likely to click on an ad if it has a free sample (53%) or if it offers a coupon (57%). So be sure to include these incentives in your marketing mix, and follow up with more in-depth messages on parenting social media sites and Spanish-language blogs. 

Throughout my own journey – from a low-acculturated mom who didn't speak English to a fully integrated, multilingual professional – I've definitely noticed which brands "get" me and which brands aren't trying hard enough. As the buying power of Hispanic moms increases, more marketers are going to have to step up their game if they want to earn the lasting loyalty of this vast and influential group of consumers.

By Clarisse Cespedes

America's New Baby Boomers

Tags:
(Posted on Feb 13, 2014 at 03:46AM by William Cosgrove)
According to Nielson, The Hispanic consumer represents the greatest potential for sustained growth in the U.S. today. At the current rate of expansion, Hispanics will drive population growth and, in turn, consumption in America for the next generation. Reaching Hispanics effectively should be at the top of every marketer’s to-do list. Hispanics actively embrace new technologies and platforms, while keeping close ties to their roots, especially language. And while Hispanics do consume English-language media, Spanish-language media holds the key to connecting with the greatest number of Hispanic consumers most effectively.

Nielsen breaks down the prevailing myths surrounding Hispanic interaction with today’s media.

MYTH #1:

There is a belief that once Hispanics learn to speak English well and become bilingual, they become “acculturated” and use English as their primary language. However, acculturation is a process rather than an absolute classification whereby Hispanics adopt American customs while still guarding their culture, heritage and traditions. While 77 percent of U.S. Hispanics speak English well, according to current American Community Survey estimates, 61 percent of Hispanics aged 18+ tell Nielsen they prefer to speak Spanish in their homes versus only 17 percent who say they speak only English. Spanish language remains a core component of the Hispanic home long after English proficiency is gained

Monique Manso, publisher of People en Espanol, cautioned that publishers entering this space -- whether in English or Spanish -- need to speak to Hispanic consumers in a contextually relevant way. "There is the danger of not speaking to them correctly," she said.

MYTH #2:

 I can reach Hispanics through my general market campaigns; SPANISH-LANGUAGE ADVERTISING IS AN EXPENDABLE PART OF MY BUDGET. Besides providing access to a unique audience, Spanish-language advertising is generally more effective than English-language advertising for Hispanics. Nielsen’s advertising effectiveness studies show that advertisers who translate English ads into Spanish receive an increase in general recall among Hispanics when compared to general market English-language commercials. However, original Spanish ads (ads that do not have an English counterpart or that are based on existing ads by modifying the narrative and soundtrack) see a 15 percent general recall lift from English-dominant Hispanics and a 69 percent general recall increase from Spanish-dominant Hispanics. Two reasons for this effect are that Spanish ads create a deeper personal connection to Hispanic consumers and Hispanics are less likely to time shift Spanish-language programming.

Michael Sebastian AdAge Media News "Publishing companies realized they had to do a specific product for these consumers," he said. "It was not just about adding a couple of pages in their main book to reach these consumers." 

MYTH #3:

HISPANICS are late adopters of technology, so using online and mobile campaigns is unnecessary. New studies are finding that Hispanics are equally, if not more involved in emerging technologies than the general market. A recent look at Nielsen’s national people meter panel reveals that Hispanics are just as likely as non-Hispanics to own an HDTV (69% vs.66%). And Nielsen’s 2010 Q4 mobile insights survey of more than 50,000 people and more than 8,000 Hispanics reveals that Hispanics are not only more likely to own a smartphone, but also they are part of the most valuable mobile consumer segments, carrying an average monthly bill that is 14 percent higher than the market average. Hispanics also lead all ethnic groups with an average of 40 percent more calls made per day and are the most likely ethnic group to use text messaging, mobile Internet and e-mail. They are also more likely to download pictures or music on mobile devices.

The Hispanic consumer represents the greatest potential for sustained growth in the U.S. today. At the current rate of expansion, Hispanics will drive population growth and, in turn, consumption in America for the next generation. Reaching Hispanics effectively should be at the top of every marketer’s to-do list. Hispanics actively embrace new technologies and platforms, while keeping close ties to their roots, especially language. And while Hispanics do consume English-language media, Spanish-language media holds the key to connecting with the greatest number of Hispanic consumers most effectively.

Picture
More Facts:

The Hispanic segment of the US Population Represent the 13th largest economy in the world and are the youngest, fastest growing segment of the US population representing 60 % of overall population growth here in the US.

The tremendous Buying power of Hispanics is growing exponentially including a current per capita income of ($39,730) that is closing in on the national average ($57,009.00) makes it important to finds ways to effectively penetrate this market now and into the future.

Hispanic households defined as having an income of $75,000 or more have more than doubled accounting for 75% of all Hispanic Consumers. Their buying power will be worth over 680 billion dollars by 2015.

More than 8 in 10 (82%) Latino Adults say they speak Spanish and nearly all (95%) say it is important for future generations to do so.

54% of Spanish- dominant Hispanics are “Much more loyal to companies that show appreciation of our culture by advertising in Spanish.

Hispanics are the largest users of internet and mobile data services of any segment of the population in the US.

Hispanics are:
The most community minded segment of the US population
The most socially active segment of the US population
The most connected segment of the US Population

Monique Manso, publisher of People en Espanol, cautioned that publishers entering this space -- whether in English or Spanish -- need to speak to Hispanic consumers in a contextually relevant way. "There is the danger of not speaking to them correctly," she said.

William Cosgrove

Additional Must read material:

A Market not to be Ingnored


Statistics:
(United States Census Bureau & Income Pew Research Center  2012.)

Humphries J, The multicultural economy 2012

Selig Center for economic growth 2012

Nielson Pop-Facts 2011-2016